Creekers

Creekers - Edward Lee Edward Lee's stories from his rural Appalachia mythos (eg [b:Creekers|1472673|Creekers|Edward Lee|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1214882156s/1472673.jpg|209370], [b:Goon|102164|Goon|Edward Lee|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1347380904s/102164.jpg|98504], [b:The Minotauress|2903168|The Minotauress|Edward Lee|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1206044216s/2903168.jpg|2930307], etc) are like cotton candy. Everyone knows the formula, everyone knows what to expect when they pick it up, and ultimately it's hard to recollect where one book starts and another ends. The writing is solid enough to not call any attention to itself, they're each easy to read and hard to put down. As far as I can tell, there's no real specific timeline to the mythos, and thus there's not any particular order to read them.

Keep in mind, however, that what other reviewers have said about Edward Lee's spectacularly depraved imagination and the depths of filth, gore, perversion, violence, misery and casual disrespect for the vast majority of the victims in his stories is absolutely true. Edward Lee's Appalachia books are not for those proud of their delicate sensibilities, nor for the horror fan who is looking for "bump in the night" chills. These books are for readers looking for fun, easy to read splatterpunky stories that focus on creating vivid imagery to the detriment of wildly involved plots or Impressive Metaphors About The Human Condition.

Cotton candy for the crowd of jaded readers looking for outlandish prurience and cheap escapism. We know who we are, and we love Mr. Lee for providing us such wonderful entertainment.

I've read a number of books from this mythos in the last couple of years, and I'm going to copypasta this review into each of them. With five stars each.